Last edited by Gujinn
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

7 edition of Bleeding hearts, Corydalis, and their relatives found in the catalog.

Bleeding hearts, Corydalis, and their relatives

Mark C. Tebbitt

Bleeding hearts, Corydalis, and their relatives

by Mark C. Tebbitt

  • 125 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Timber Press in Portland, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Papaveraceae,
  • Corydalis,
  • Papaveraceae -- Identification,
  • Corydalis -- Identification

  • Edition Notes

    StatementMark C. Tebbitt, Magnus Lidén, and Henrik Zetterlund ; with illustrations by Adèle Rossetti Morosini and Paul Harwood.
    GenreIdentification.
    ContributionsLidén, Magnus., Zetterlund, Henrik, 1953-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQK495.P22 T43 2008
    The Physical Object
    Pagination176 p., [44] p. of plates :
    Number of Pages176
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17045181M
    ISBN 109780881928822
    LC Control Number2007038226

    According to Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and Their Relatives, Dicentra 'Luxuriant' is a hybrid of three species of bleeding-heart: Fringed Bleeding Heart (Dicentra eximia), the Appalachian species, Pacific Bleeding Heart (Dicentra formosa), the Pacific Coast species, and Komakusa (Dicentra peregrina), the Japanese and Siberian alpine species. Etymology. The species name peregrina is Latin for "exotic, alien, foreign, strange, from foreign lands", possibly because the species is the only one of its genus outside of North America.. In Japanese, the plant (kusa) is named for the buds, which look like the head of a horse (koma).

    Some of the books listed are out of print now and you may need to search them out. Alpine Plants of North America by Graham Nicholls Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis And Their Relatives by Mark Tebbitt Magnus Liden and Henrik Zetterlund. Sarcocapnos (Greek sárx "flesh", kapnós "smoke") is a genus of at least 6 species of somewhat fleshy, cushion-forming annual to perennial plants, native to cliffs .

      Usually Corydalis sempervirens is pink with yellow tips, but according to the book Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and their relatives, it can also be white with yellow tips. I'm guessing this is the white and yellow form of Corydalis sempervirens. Some types of false bleeding heart (Corydalis spp.) have fern-like leaves, including C. cheilanthifolia, its cultivar, Manchu, and C. lutea (all have yellow flowers and grow in zones 3 to 6). Since C. lutea is by far the most popular Corydalis, it is the type that you are most likely to find in garden centers. C. lutea Alba bears white blooms.


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Bleeding hearts, Corydalis, and their relatives by Mark C. Tebbitt Download PDF EPUB FB2

This thorough guide for gardeners and botanists covers all the cultivated species, hybrids, and cultivars of Corydalis, Dicentra, and allied genera in the bleeding heart family. Written by three international experts and published in association with Brooklyn Botanic Garden, the book features concise descriptions, useful keys to the genera and Cited by: 2.

Bleeding hearts, Corydalis, and their relatives Item Preview remove-circle however, and the long-standing interest in the bleeding heart family, little has been written about these versatile and easily grown plants until now.

This thorough guide for gardeners and botanists covers all the cultivated species, hybrids, and cultivars of Pages:   Members of the bleeding heart family, such as the well-known Chinese bleeding heart, have long been among the best-loved flowers of the perennial border.

In recent years, however, excitement about this group has reached fever pitch with the introduction of dozens of stunning new discoveries, particularly among the genus Corydalis.

Super-hardy and adorned with blossoms in a 5/5(1). Magnus Liden has a PhD in plant systematics from the University of Gothenburg and has described about new species in the bleeding heart family.

He is co-author of Corydalis: A Gardener's Guide and a Monograph of the Tuberous Species (), and a senior botanical researcher and scientific curator Corydalis the Uppsala University Botanic Gardens. Get this from a library. Bleeding hearts, Corydalis, and their relatives.

[Mark C Tebbitt; Magnus Lidén; Henrik Zetterlund] -- Members of the bleeding heart family, such as the well-known Chinese bleeding heart, have long been among the best-loved flowers of the perennial border. In recent years, however, excitement about.

Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and Their Relatives by Mark C. Tebbitt,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(7). Buy Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and Their Relatives by Mark C. Tebbitt, Magnus Liden, Henrik Zetterlund (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(4). Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and Their Relatives: Liden, Magnus, Tebbitt, Mark C, Zetterlund, Henrik: : LibrosReviews: 3.

Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and Their Relatives ISBN: Authors(s): Mark C. Tebbitt About Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and Their Relatives: Members of the bleeding heart family, such as the well-known Chinese bleeding heart, have long been among the best-loved flowers of the perennial border.

Despite this fame, however, and the long-standing interest in the bleeding heart family, little has been written about these versatile and easily grown plants until now. This thorough guide for gardeners and botanists covers all the cultivated species, hybrids, and cultivars of Corydalis, Dicentra, and allied genera in the bleeding heart family.

Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, & Their Relatives [HC, ] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and Their Relatives 5/5(3). Description. Flowers have two tiny sepals and four flowers are bisymmetric: the two outer petals are spurred or pouched at the base and curved outwards or backwards at the tip, and the two inner ones with or without a crest at the tip.

In Dicentra, all leaves are in a basal rosette, and flowers are on leafless other genera with bisymmetric heart-shaped flowers. Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and Their Relatives by Mark C. Tebbitt "A long awaited book" - by Terryj (UK). Bleeding Hearts,Corydalis and Dicentra At one time or another most gardeners in England will have grown Corydalis.

It is mostly the large red and white Bleeding Heart, and around these parts there is the yellow corydalis that grows wild in stone crevices. Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and Their Relatives. Members of the bleeding heart family, such as the well-known Chinese bleeding heart, have long been among the best-loved flowers of the perennial recent years, however, excitement about this group has reached fever pitch with the introduction of dozens of stunning new discoveries, particularly among the genus Corydalis.

(English) Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Place, publisher, year, edition, pages Timber press,p. National Category Botany. Bleeding hearts, Corydalis, and their relatives by Tebbitt, M, Lidén, M.

& H. Zetterlund Article in Curtis&apos s Botanical Magazine 27(1) - 95 March with 25 Reads How we measure 'reads'. Thanks for the information.

I had already read the information in the Corydalis and Relatives book and thought that there might be more to this. I'm glad that others have shared their experience with this species - this gives me a starting point and I can take it from there.

To find out more about this name change, I went down the rabbit hole and came up with some scholarly journals that made very little sense, but then took a turn somewhere and discovered the book Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and Their Relatives By Mark C. Tebbitt, Magnus Lidén, and Henrik Zetterlund (, Timber Press, $).

If the address matches an existing account you will receive an email with instructions to retrieve your username. Magnus Liden is the author of Corydalis (Papaveraceae ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 reviews) and Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and Their Relatives ( av 4/5(1).America's garden book, c Annuals for every garden: Arbeit Sicherheit vorOrt: AS vorOrt: Bleeding hearts, Corydalis and their relatives: Brooklyn Bot.

Gard. outreach sta. Brooklyn Botanic Garden all-region guides: Brooklyn Botanic Garden guides for a greener planet: Brooklyn Botanic Garden publications: Bulbs for indoors: year-round.Description.

Pacific bleeding-heart is a perennial herbaceous leaves are three to four times divided and fern-like, growing from a brittle rhizome at the base of the plant. It grows to 18 in (45 cm) tall by 24 in (60 cm) wide. The flowers are pink, red, or white and heart-shaped and bloom in clusters of 5 to 15 at the top of leafless, fleshy stems above the leaves from mid-spring to.